Tag Archives: eco-living

Happy Holidays

As the year comes to a close, I would like to wish all my readers a very happy holiday!

2012 has seen some amazing ups and downs in the conservation world, from the creation of the world’s largest network of marine parks, to the ban of live shark finning in Costa Rica and the EU, to the rejection of the supertrawler F.V. Margiris from Australian fisheries, to disappointing environmental commitments at Rio20 and the 15y anniversary of the Kyoto Treaty.

As always, there were great stories of success, sustainability, innovation and inspirational conservation from around the world. And as always, there is still much, much more to do…

But for now I just want to say, thanks for joining me in my first year of blogging. If you haven’t purchased all your eco-Christmas gifts, there is still time! I’d recommend heading over to TreeHugger’s blog for some good ideas if you’re stuck. This time of year always makes me feel generous, and there are many charitable organisations out there looking for some donations as well. Or you could go the whole hog (literally or not), and help out someone less fortunate than you, if you can.

So go on, be excellent to each other.

Have a great holiday season and best wishes for whatever the new year brings.

Cute Christmas Penguin with Santa Hat

P.S. If the world does end tomorrow, this still applies…

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Rescue kittens

I haven’t been able to blog much lately, sorry everyone. This is because we just moved house and the Internet hasn’t been connected yet. I will be back soon though, and hopefully with some great marine news and conservation inspiration.

In the meantime, I would like to introduce you to the newest members of our family: Loki and Neko, two gorgeous little boys who were looking for a home. We got them from Cat Haven, a rescue shelter here in WA, and I’m really looking forward to looking after them for the rest of their lives.

More to come on these little kittens I’m sure. But for now until I get Internet and can write another blog properly again (this iPhone app isn’t that great), hello and see you soon.

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How to Choose Sustainable Tuna

Greenpeace has just launched its 4th edition of the Australian Canned Tuna Guide.  For those of you out there that love your tuna and the oceans, you really must take a look for yourself, so you can make an informed choice about your tuna.

You can download the above image as an A4 poster to stick on your fridge: Click here (PDF 1.27MB)

I was involved in bringing the first canned tuna guide to the Australian public a couple of years ago. Back then, none of the cans on our shelves were sustainable, with catches of overfished yellowfin tuna, destructive fishing methods and politically poor fishing choices packaged up and sold to us with barely any labeling.   Down the line we’ve seen a complete game change in the canned tuna market, with companies like Fish 4 Ever and Safcol providing sustainable, pole-and-line caught skipjack tuna, and genuinely working towards a sustainable future.

The tuna brands are ranked according to their:

  • sustainability policy
  • fishing method used (Fish Aggregating Devices, or FADs, are a definite no-no because of the unacceptable bycatch levels)
  • species caught (yellowfin and bigeye are overfished)
  • labelling – so that customers can make an informed choice
  • support for marine reserves (ensuring long-term sustainability) and equitable tuna policies (so that reasonable economic benefits are returned to countries who own the rights to certain tuna stocks)
  • guarantee of a supply chain free from illegal, unregulated or unreported (IUU) fishing (which accounts for up to 46% of fishing activity in the Pacific)

Since the first guide was released, consumer pressure has forced many brands to change their tuna. You can now buy eight different brands of sustainable pole-and-line caught tuna, in most supermarkets.  Safcol for example was the first Australian company to commit to 100% sustainable tuna – an industry-changing move.  They also actively promote sustainable fishing methods and the conservation of overfished species.  Greenseas and Sirena are making a positive change by committing to 100% FAD-free sourcing by 2015.  But several other brands still lag behind, sometimes offering up one sustainable brand whilst making little effort across their range, or in the case of Sole Mare, none at all.

Greenpeace’s current campaign is focusing on John West.  As Australia’s largest seller of canned tuna, John West is having the most damaging impact on marine life through the 10% bycatch rate of its fishing method (FADs and purse seines).  That means they catch the equivalent of about 10 million cans of bycatch every year.

If you would like John West to step up their game and change to sustainable tuna, you can tell them here.

So check out where your favourite brand comes out – and why – in the Greenpeace Canned Tuna Guide.

Make an informed choice, and use your consumer power to make a difference.  Choose sustainable tuna next time you shop.

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